David Mitchell – The Bone Clocks

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Sometimes a book can send you off your beaten path and help you to explore authors you might never have come across. I read The Bone Clocks, just after it was released, and it was the start of a new direction, in which genre still plays a key role, which a few years ago I would never have entertained. Have I had the same moment I felt when instead of just knowing the Rolling Stones or Bruce Springsteen I finally listened. Have I Grown up?

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In 1984, teenager Holly Sykes runs away from home, a Gravesend pub after a fight with her mother. Sixty years later, she is to be found in the far west of Ireland, raising a granddaughter as the world’s climate collapses. In between, Holly is encountered as a barmaid in a Swiss resort by a sociopath in 1991; has a child with a foreign correspondent covering the Iraq War in 2003; becomes the confidante of a self-obsessed author of fading powers and reputation during the present decade. Yet these changing personae are only part of the story, as Holly’s life is repeatedly intersected by a slow-motion war between a cult of predatory soul-decanters and a band of vigilantes led by one Doctor Marinus. Holly begins as an unwitting pawn in this war – but may prove to be its decisive weapon

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This book is composed of six parts, dropping in chronologically throughout Holly’s life. Four of part are told through the eyes of characters holly encounters along the way and these provide a great change in pace and style that makes each one brilliantly unique. From Hugo Lamb’s (James Mcavoy in the film surly?) predatory life as a Cambridge undergraduate to an immortal being waging war, each proved a glimpse into holly’s life and emotions and genuinely make you care without eclipsing Holly. My personal favorite is Crispin Hershey, a former “wild child of British literature” whose career is in free-fall. Crispin meets Holly and the literary festival circuit when the queue he thought was for him is really for her.

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The story isn’t the best you will ever read but Mitchell has a great talent for making you care about the people and to read between the lines. I was glued to every page even though there isn’t much story progression until the final few scenes. This book feels like the side notes to the main story but just told incredibly well.

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I was lucky enough to meet David on his tour and take some pictures, which I have shared in this review. I was compelled to attend mainly because Bone Clocks is the only one of his books I’ve read and that is what sent me down the path I’m on now. The books he recommend to me I’ve loved, The WindUp Bird Chronicle by Haruki Murakami to name one.

So my conclusion from this, and something I will take forward into the new year and beyond is to keep more of an open mind about literature, just because something is listed for the Man Booker or is placed in Richard and Judy’s book club, doesn’t mean is shite. 🙂

Maybe i’ve grown up

david and the beard

No way.

Drop me your thoughts and book recommendations into the comments below or tweet me @europaoutlaw

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2 Comments

Filed under Book Reviews

2 responses to “David Mitchell – The Bone Clocks

  1. I’ve heard so much about this one- definitely adding to my TBR 🙂 Hope you check out my debut novel, THE WAITING ROOM!

  2. i have heard a lot about this as well, going to get it for my kindle and start the journey

    thanks for the share

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